Yasna 32.14 based on the ancient commentary


Copyright: @2013 Ardeshir Farahmand. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

In essence, the greedy priests have given up the gift of foresight/truth,

For the poet seers have forsaken the realizing power of their spirit/mind

Their miraculous skills since olden times

Is known to have come to the support of the treacherous

For they speak of slaying/slaughter of the animal/cow

In order to ignite/blaze forth the favor of the dispeller of death and decay

ahyá geréhmö  á-höithöi

ü öshán pah  grehmak masí

In essence, the greedy priests have given up the gift of foresight/truth,

Ahyá; substance, essential nature

geréhmö; “to be greedy, voracious,” Old Norse graðr

á-höithöi from haithya; Vedic satya, “sooth, truth,” Old English soð,

ní kávayas-chít khratüsh dadat

bará pah kíkán khiradö bará bi dehad [kih pádakhsháhí pah parak/ rishwat bi dehad pah khiradö í öshán kih mindavam í yazadán kör ud kar]

For the poet seers have forsaken the realizing power of their spirit/mind [they have become deaf and blind to the adorable powers of Gd]

kávayas from kávi; “poet-seer, philosopher-king,” Latin caveat, “be aware, watch” Lithuanian kavoti “watch, safeguard”

khratüsh from khratü; Vedic kratú is “the creative power of spirit/mind, the realizing, manifesting power of spirit/mind, Geisteskraft.” Khratü is the passion, energy power/force to manifest visions, create, and do work. It comes from the Proto Indo European base kar-/ker “to have power, bring forth, create.” Greek kratia,Old English cræft ,Dutch kracht, German Kraft, Icelandic kraftur, Old Norse kraptr all come from the same root and mean originally “having power to create, bring forth, realize, manifest.”

varečáhí-chá fraidivá

pah án í varzánán avárünö dánákánö  ud freh pádistánö [kih pah avárünöí hü-böí pah dar dárad];

Their miraculous skills since olden times

varečáhí; Vedic varčas, “Miraculous power, extraordinary skill/work”

fraidivá; Vedic pradiv, “foretime, earlier days,”

hyat víseñtá dregvañtem avö

ud kih ham padíreend án darvand aíyyárí, [ham pah khiradö öshán báshad],

Is known to have come to the support of the treacherous

Víseñtá from víd; “to know, have seen,” german wissen

Avö; “favor, support, aid”

Dregvañtem; “treacherous, duplicity”

hyat-chá gáush jaidyái mraóí

ud kih ham avö gáv zanishö güftö

For they speak of slaying/slaughter of the animal/cow

Gáush; gaia, “living, animal, livestock, cow”

Jaidyái; “to slay, strike, beat, slaughter, kill”

Mraóí; “tell, speak, narrate, recount” German Märchen, Old High German  mari “tale, narrate”

ýé düraóshem saóčayat avö

kih án andar í düraósh güftö avö aíyyárí, [ham pah khiradö öshán báshad].

In order to ignite/blaze forth the favor of the dispeller of death and decay

saóčayat; “shine,  blaze forth, ignite,”

avö; “support, favor”

düraóshem; “dispeller of death and decay” the first part dür means “to dispel, drive away”, also means “long, distant, afar” Compare Greek dolikhos. The second part aósh denotes “defect, falling apart, failing”

ardeshir

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Yasna 32.14 based on the ancient commentary

  1. John Easter says:

    I been meaning to ask you about this about all the verse translations. The second part not in bold comes from the Denkard right? And despite what some say it is in harmony with the Gathic text and helps with understanding it?

    ü öshán pah grehmak masí

    bará pah kíkán khiradö bará bi dehad [kih pádakhsháhí pah parak/ rishwat bi dehad pah khiradö í öshán kih mindavam í yazadán kör ud kar]

    pah án í varzánán avárünö dánákánö ud freh pádistánö [kih pah avárünöí hü-böí pah dar dárad];

    ud kih ham padíreend án darvand aíyyárí, [ham pah khiradö öshán báshad],

    ud kih ham avö gáv zanishö güftö

    kih án andar í düraósh güftö avö aíyyárí, [ham pah khiradö öshán báshad].

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s