Yasna 28.1 based on the ancient commentary


Copyright: @2013 Ardeshir Farahmand ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

I desire, yearn (for the very prize of ahúrmazd’s own self) through contemplation, mental focus (when I would bring about an enumeration of wonderful, adorable godly virtues/talents;) lifting up the hands (with passion of spirit/mind) for (the own self of) joy;

(Seeking) the (enchanting) spirit/mind of ahúrmazd, the first/foremost, the splendid, auspicious and prosperous;
By excellence, brilliance in all actions, (so that all acts are melodic;)

Through the power of an awe-inspiring, wondrous spirit/mind to create (through intuitive wisdom/ingenuity;)
Thus, delighting/gaining intimate knowledge of the spirit of gaia/the living universe, (that is the stewardship/care of auspicious animals is to be done with much foresight and wisdom.)

ahyá yásá nem.ang.há

án (mozd í ü í Ahúrmazd khvísh) khvaham pah níyáyishnö (kih dádak-göbí í Yazadánö vehánö vadüname)

I desire, yearn (for the very prize of ahúrmazd’s own self) through contemplation, mental focus (when I would bring about an enumeration of wonderful, adorable godly virtues/talents.)

nem.ang.há comes from nemö, “turning the focus of mind/thoughts onto something, reflection, giving regard to,” Compare Greek noesis, “thought, mental focus” also Greek neuein, Latin numen from nuere “to nod,” Proto Indo European neu; “nod, give regard to, assent” Persian namáyesh, nemu-dan “beholding, looking at, exhibit to view” and Persian namaz come both from the same ancient Avestan root in the poetic gathas. It is the third word of the gathas and means that gathas are inspired poetry, a reflection on Gd and a display of godly virtues, formulas and powers.

ústána zastö rafeðr.ahyá

aüstánö-dast (mínishní) pah rámishnö (í khvísh)

lifting up the hands (with passion of spirit/mind) for (the own self of) joy

man.yéush mazdá paöúr.vím speñt.ahyá

pah mínüí Ahúrmazd fratüm (pah gasaníkíh) afzáyínishnö

(Seeking) the (enchanting) spirit/mind of ahúrmazd, the first/foremost, the splendid, auspicious and prosperous

Speñtá, Lithuanian šventas, Proto-Baltic-Slavic swęntŭs  or swiętość, Old Prussian
swentas the original meaning is “auspicious, bright, splendid, fortunate.” Compare Sanskrit shiva, svetah; Old Church Slavonic svetu, Lithuanian sviesti, svaityti meanin “splendid, bright, auspicious.” Ancient commentary translates Speñtá as afzáyínishn or fzünik. Middle Persian fzünik comes from Avestan fshü. Compare with the rune fehu, the rune of prosperity. It has the exact same meaning in Middle Persian “prosperous, of good fortune, flourishing.”

ashá víspéñg shyaö.tha.ná

aharáyíh í pah harvispö künishnö (kü künishnö hamák pah gasaníkíh künishnö.)

By excellence, brilliance in all actions, (so that all acts are melodic)

Compare Avestan shyaö to Old English scēon, Old Frisian schia, German geschehen,  schehen: “happen, to come to pass, occur,” Farsi shodan comes from the same root.

vang.héush khratüm man.ang.hö

pah án í vohüman khiradö (pah asnö khiradö)

Through the power of an awe-inspiring, wondrous spirit/mind to create (through intuitive wisdom/ingenuity)

Khratü, Vedic kratú is the creative power of spirit/mind. It is the “Geisteskraft” or the power of spirit/mind to create/manifest. Khratü is the passion, energy power/force to manifest visions, create, and do work.
khratü comes from the Proto Indo European base kar-/ker “to have power, bring forth, create.” Greek kratia “have power over, Old English cræft , Dutch kracht, German Kraft, Icelandic kraftur, Old Norse kraptr all come from the same root and mean originally “having power to create, bring forth, manifest

ýá khshnevíshá géush-chá úrvánem

shnáyínishnö í gösh-áúrvan (kü páhrejö (parvarishn) í göspendán pah dánákíh künishnö

Thus, delighting/gaining intimate knowledge of the spirit of gaia/the living universe, (that is the stewardship/care of auspicious animals is to be done with much foresight and wisdom.)

In the poetic gathas; géush is the primeval cow, the embodiment of life and living creatures. It also means “livestock, cattle, cow.”Compare to to Auðumbla or the primeval cow of the Norse mythology and Greek Gaia (also Gē or Gaea) as the giver of life to the Earth and all the Universe.

ardeshir

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7 Responses to Yasna 28.1 based on the ancient commentary

  1. Bahman Rusi says:

    wonderful!
    will it be continued?

    • Yes, it was requested of me to do one or two verses each week. I have not added the etymology of the words or the commentary of each gathic nask on each verse, but is based on the standard ancient commentary derived from the gathic nasks. In future, the adadditions will be made. But for now, hopefully this will be enlightening.

  2. Kaikhosrow Oshtori says:

    Wonderfully presented.
    Will you explain if ‘Z’ism’ accepts new entrants into the Faith?
    It has for long, been the bone of contention on several forums.
    What is your interpretation of the Gathas on that score?

    • Ardeshir Farahmand says:

      A future article will address that issue faithfully and truthfully based on the Avestan evidence. Thanks for ur patience.

  3. zaneta garratt says:

    most inspiring, very poetic, very deep

  4. Mazdayasnian says:

    Is it Zand or Pazand commentary?

  5. Danny says:

    Beautiful!

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