Yasna 48.10 based on the ancient commentary


Copyright: @2013 Ardeshir Farahmand. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

When O Mazda shall the brave know this passionate, inspired wisdom (when shall come a time when there will be increase, growth among my disciples)

When shall this defilement/impurity, be cast away from wine

For evil incarnate are the sacrificial priests (who are deaf and blind in the matters of the adorable Gd;) it is they who lay waste/ravage the power of healing and growth (that is they are not protectors and stewards of the creation)

Such is the manifesting power of the malicious rulers of the land.

kadá  mazdá mánaröish narö víseñtæ

Kai án dahishn Ahúrmazd, kih avö man rá gabrá andar gabrán padírishn, [kü án damánakö kai rasad, kih havish­tánö í man rübákí bündak báshad]

When O Mazda shall the brave know this passionate, inspired wisdom (when shall come a time when there will be increase, growth among my disciples)

Mánaröish from man; “passion, spirit, fervor, inspired wisdom,” also a “divine message expressed in passionate/inspired poetry” Compare with Old Norse Mímir

Naröi from nar; “valiant, having power, brave,” Proto-Indo-European root nḗr Cognates include Ancient Greek ἀνήρ (anēr) Persian (nar) and Sanskrit नर (nára.) Also compare with Lithuanian nóras “will power” Old Irish ner, Welsh nêr/ nerth “manliness, courage, hero,” Modern Breton: nerzh “power,” Latin: neriōsus “firm, resolute, powerful,” The personal name Nerō comes from the same root.

Víseñtæ from vis; to know, German wissen

kadá ajén müthrem ahyá mad-ahyá

Kai án dahishn kishán jundínind mütrishnö öshán pah án magí [pah án aveejak badtari]

When shall this defilement/impurity, be cast away from wine

Ajén; “to strike out, cast away, dispose”

Müthrem from müthr; “mud, filth, impurity” Proto-Germanic mud denoting “wet” or “dirty”, Sanskrit mutra- “urine,” Avestan müthra- “impurity, filth” related to German Schmutz  “dirt, mud, liquid filth”

mad-ahyá  from madü; “wine, mead,” Old High German metu, Polish miód Old Church Slavonic medu, Lithuanian medus “honey,” Old Irish mid Sanskrit maðú, Greek methy “wine, mead,” Persian may/mäy =wine

ýá añgrayá karapanö urüpayæiñtí

kih ganák hömand [kü zadár hömand] ud karp hömand [kü pavanich mindavam í Yazdán kar ud kör hömand] ránínind pánakí [kü pánakí dámán na vadünánd]

For evil incarnate are the sacrificial priests (who are deaf and blind in the matters of the adorable Gd;) it is they who ravage the power of healing and growth (that is they are not protectors and stewards of the creation)

Karapanö from karap; “ritual master” Kalpa is one of the six disciplines of Vedanga, treating ritual, the performance of the great sacrifices and animal sacrificial rites

Urüpayæiñtí from urüp; “power to grow” Compare farsi rooyesh, It also means to “ravage, rob, lay waste” Compare farsi roboo-dan; Vedic ropayati also means “to cause to grow, prosper, thrive” at the same time “ravage, violence, lay waste”

The 2nd and 3rd line of the above gathic poetry can be compared to the charm against poisonous drinks in the athrva veda 4,6,3. Thou didst not madden him (ná-mímadó) thou didst not lay waste on him, (ná-rúrupá) yea, thou didst turn into food (pitúh) for him 

ýá-chá khratü dushe-khshathrá dakhyúnánm.

Kih ham pah khirad dúsh khúdáyee [hömand] pah matá

Such is the manifesting power of the malicious rulers of the land

 Khratü; “power of the spirit to manifest itself, take form, Geisteskraft”  

ardeshir

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